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Request Research Funding from the AAEP Foundation by June 15

April, 9th 2019

Alternate opening:  The AAEP Foundation, the charitable arm of the American Association of Equine Practitioners, is now accepting grant proposals from AAEP-member graduate students and residents for up to $20,000 in funding for the study of key diseases and disorders affecting equine health. The submission deadline is June 15.

The charitable arm of the American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP), the AAEP Foundation, is now accepting research grant proposals for up to $20,000 in funding from AAEP member graduate students and residents. The deadline to submit proposals is June 15.

Pressing research topics, based on a recent AAEP Foundation survey, include musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal and metabolic disease; laminitis; and new technologies such as stall side test development. However, all applications will be considered.

Pilot studies or preliminary studies which are part of a major study or which will lead to a major project are of particular interest; small stand-alone projects will also be considered.

“As a leading benefactor for the welfare of all horses and working equids, increasing the opportunities and funding available for exceptional science is important to us,” said Dr. Anthony Blikslager, AAEP Foundation Advisory Council Research Subcommittee chairman.  “We look forward to seeing the great work being done by the young equine research community and hope this is one of many steps that the AAEP Foundation can take to impact the well-being of horses.”

More information about this grant, application instructions, requirements and selection criteria are available at foundation.aaep.org/apply-for-funding/grants.

About the AAEP Foundation
The AAEP Foundation, a 501(c)(3) organization established in 1994, serves as the charitable arm of the American Association of Equine Practitioners to improve the welfare of horses. Since its inception, the Foundation has disbursed more than $5.4 million to fulfill its vital mission.
 

Photo courtesy of Dr. Nat White.